Saison

Blissfully abounds
Poetry of seasons
Merry-go-rounds
In scrumptious silence

Poetry of seasons
Ferment of spring
In scrumptious silence
Hops of June sing

Ferment of spring
Headiness of youth
Hops of June sing
Harvests of truth

Headiness of youth
Blissfully abounds
Harvests of truth
Merry-go-rounds

 

Colin Lee

colin-lee-small

To those who don’t drink, the zesty saison is a traditional farmhand ale from Belgium. Thanks to Charley’s marvellous pantoum, Before the Wind, I was inspired to adopt the form to frame this poem with which I had been wrestling for months. Voila! A blissful fit for my offer to dVerse’s Quadrille #39, prompt word “bliss”. Like a villanelle, a pantoum is a highly repetitive form; so much so I actually used a spreadsheet to draft it!

2017.08.29 Saison 2

Photo Courtesy: dsm.com
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44 thoughts on “Saison

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  1. Harvest of truth! That just sings. This reads like a drinking song, although, after severals ales I doubt one could maintain the form. I have several unfinished Pantoums; as much as I love form, it eludes me. You and Charley do it well! Love the photo of your spreadsheet – great idea.

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    1. Unfinished pantoums? Several of them? Sounds like someone is stockpiling her arsenal for the Casting Brick Challenge. Scary fairy! Anyway, thank you for the warning … and the compliment, Jilly. 🙂

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    1. I actually agree with you, Frank, and have pondered long and hard whether or not to close it as: “Headiness of youth / Merry-go-rounds / Harvest of truth / Blissfully abounds”. While being equally true to form, that does sound more blissful. I’d admit that it’s the quality of the poet, not the poem, which decided on the “imperfect”, bittersweet ending. Unlike you, whose years have been plenty (for youth to be viewed in a fond childhood light and for experience to abound), the young poet here is nevertheless in the bliss of his youthful ignorance, who feels less grateful for the painful process of growth (“merry-go-rounds” as in running round in circles, not the jovial funfair). It’s somewhat a confession, not a nostalgic reflection. But, perhaps in another thirty years, suppose the poet qualifies the years, he will then be able to proudly revise the poem with its “perfect” ending? I’m truly glad you raised the point, sir, to help me reflect on the reasons of my choice. Thank you! 🙂

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      1. You bring up a good point about the two different ideas associated with “merry-go-round”, one blissful and the other a painful inability to make progress. I do like the idea of a spiral better than a circle for making progress. The carousel is definitely a circle.

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      2. You’re right, Frank. I suppose being weighed down by growing pressure whilst lacking a clear vision has given me the illusion that growth seems like a circle. Perhaps with a few extra years I’ll see the spiralling coming along. Appreciate your word of wisdom, as always.

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      1. Will do, Charlie. I have much to learn from your writing. While surrealism is the event horizon to me (beyond which lurks sheer insanity, it seems), I admire your bravery to dwell and excel at that lofty (and dangerous) end of the spectrum. (And I mean this literally.) Cheers, my friend.

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      1. Not when one does so with so much passion, depth and originality. I was only too afraid my mentioning didn’t do you justice, sir. You’re most welcome.

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      2. Dang, with all that effort, you still aren’t blushing. Mate, I’ll try harder next time. lol But, oh my word, Charley, what an outpour of love this morning, in tripled dosage! Frankly, I have a much lower threshold to blushing — blame it on the complexion (I know!). I’ll come back to you later. Now off I go, to the merry-go-round (work)! 🙂

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      3. I’ve actually never tried that before. A merry-go-round is a rarity in tiny Hong Kong, not to mention one that spits out metal rings. But, you’re right, I should strive for it (at work).

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    1. No problem at all, Lillian. It’s a blessing enough we can exchange in affordable leisure and not obliged to reading everyone and everything — which, on the other hand, makes every single one of your visits priceless to me. Thanks! 🙂

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